Pearls of Wisdom

These pearls of wisdom are based upon the ancient legends and philosophy found in the Talmud and folklore of the Jewish people. These were found in old newspapers under a column written by David Morantz.



Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, September 13, 1937

Silence, says the Talmud, is the first step to wisdom; attention, the second; observance, the third and practice the fourth.

The tongue of the wise is guided by his thoughts; the thoughts of the fool are led by his lips.

He who seeks wisdom is intelligent; he who thinks that he already possesses it, is a fool.

He is wise who learns from everybody.

The wise man is a greater asset to a nation than is a king.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, June 28, 1937

When a kindness is done you, says the Talmud, even though it be small, make much of it but when you do a kindness to another, mention it not, even though it be great.

A man is obligated to pay the same respect to his wife's father as he would to his own father.

There are many ways in which one is to be shown to parents. If they have a certain corner in their room which they prefer or a certain chair on which they sit, these are not to be used even when not used by them. They must not contradicted and attention is to be shown them in every possible way.

A man must suffer when the community suffers.

Many who possess much, enjoy but litle.

To have no faithful friends is worse than death.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, May 6, 1938

Cast not pearls before swine nor express wisdom to one not capable of appreciating its value for wisdom is more precious than pearls and he who does not see it is worse than the swine.

For every ailment there is a remedy for the man who, when he finishes a meal, goes immediately to sleep thereafter.

He who takes medicine and neglects his diet, wastes the skill of his physician.

Three things weaken the strength of man; fear, travel and sin.

Love labor and dislike lordship.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, August 18, 1938

At the door of poverty, friendship takes wings.

Be cautious with people who affect much outward friendship and kindness, and, generally speakings, with people who obtrude their friendship without being acquainted with you.

Companionship and food fellowship must not be mistaken for true friendship.

Receive every person with friendship.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, June 3, 1939

It is easy to convince a wise man, says the Talmud, but difficult to reason with a fool.

It is in vain to learn wisdom, and yet live foolishly.

It is not a rule that scholars beget scholars.

A large head does not necessarily indicate wisdom.

Let thy house be a house of assembly for the wise and drink in their words with thirstiness.

Liberality consists not in giving largely, but in giving wisely.

Like a house without a foundation, so is one without wisdom.

Modesty is the glory of wisdom.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, August 1, 1939

Abundance is a trouble, says the Talmud, but competence brings delight.

Absolute idleness leads to insanity.

Accept no favors with which thou canst dispense.

Accept nothing from a miser.

The adornment of wisdom is modesty, and the adornment of noble performance is secrecy.

Adversity will not last forever.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, January 8, 1940

He who urges others to give charity and causes them to practice it, says the Talmud, earns a greater reward than he who gives.

He who visits the sick frequently is praiseworthy, but his calls must not trouble the invalid.

He who wades deeper and deeper into learning must grow bigger and bigger in order to keep his head above it.

He who it is hard to provoke and easy to pacify is deserving of great respect.

He whose works exceed his wisdom, his wisdom will endure, but he whose wisdom exceeds his works, his wisdom will not endure.

He who will not be advised cannot be helped.


Pearls of Wisdom published by The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, April 6, 1940

Consider that all which thou art possessed today may not be thine tomorrow; and if thou art not certain that property already in thy possession will remain with thee, what is the use of striving to possess what belongs to others?

Consider thy neighbor's liking by thine own and be discreet in every point.

Consult not with a fool, for he can neither give nor keep counsel.

Contemptible is he, who, upon being invited to a friend's house, invites a friend of his own, without the consent or knowledge of his host, to come with him; but even more contemptible is he who is ready with his answer before he had fully heard what one has to say.

Content makes poor men rich, and discontent makes rich men poor.

Contracts should never be undertaken unless they can be strictly performed.


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Below is the writte up about these pearls of wisdom:
Due to the extensive interest in Talmudic Tales, 128 of the legends and over 500 Pearls of Wisdom have been collect in an attractive book of 195 pages, handsomely bound in grained blue vellum cloth, with gold-stamped title. Autographed by author. Suitable for gifts or prizes. Price $1.50 post paid.

Interesting that the book cost only 1.50 back in the lat 1930's. Today am sure it would sell for over 20.00. However, one should note that the wisdom written well over 50 years ago still has application today!!



Related:
Wise Quotes  |   Wisdom Quotes  |   Bible Verses about Wisdom  |   Pearls of Wisdom  |   Solomonís Words for the Wise  |  


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